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REMINDER: Burn ban remains in effect

September 20, 2023

The burn ban remains as is. The LDAF burn ban prohibiting all agricultural burning, including but not limited to prescribed burning, is still in effect. This order shall remain in effect until rescinded. The LDAF will be meeting with our partners at the National Weather Service and the Louisiana Office of State Fire Marshal (SFM) weekly to reevaluate.

The same applies to the  Louisiana Office of State Fire Marshal ‘s burn ban. An active burn ban order that prohibits ALL private burning, with no limitations, pursuant to authority under R.S. 40:1602, remains in effect. Per their update on Sept. 6, Louisiana residents can resume outdoor cooking with safety measures in place. These measures include using contained cooking equipment like grills and smokers, designed for cooking purposes only, on a flame-resistant surface with a water source or fire extinguisher nearby. The fuel source for this equipment (propane, charcoal, pellets, etc.) is not a factor in its acceptable use. The use of open flames in fire pits, campfires, barrels, bonfires, burn piles, and like open burning is still prohibited.Here are some facts they are sharing regarding their burn ban:

  1. DON’T BURN ANYTHING. These three words are clear and simple. All ban orders issued on 8/25/23 read ALL OUTDOOR BURNING is prohibited with NO exceptions.

  2. The use of open flames in fire pits, campfires, barrels, bonfires, burn piles, and like-open burning is included in the burn ban.

  3. Outdoor cooking is not a citable offense, but if your cooking creates a fire that the fire department has to respond to, you will get a citation. Be sure to conduct all outdoor cooking with safety measures in place, including using contained cooking equipment like grills and smokers, designed for cooking purposes only, on a flame-resistant surface with a water source or fire extinguisher nearby.

  4. Mowing and yard work is not banned; however, it is preferred to avoid mowing and/or driving/operating hot machinery and/or any activity that could produce a spark on or near dry, brown, dead grass because of its flammability.

If you have questions about the burn ban, please contact the LDAF Forestry Office at 225-925-4500. 

Statewide burn ban issued due to concerning dry conditions

Exceptions removed following increased fire danger

August 25, 202 3

Due to an increase in fire danger across Louisiana, the previous burn ban order issued August 7th has been rescinded and reissued with an update for all agricultural burns, including but not limited to prescribed burns, to be temporarily prohibited until further notice.

This new burn ban order by Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain, DVM, in collaboration with Louisiana State Fire Marshal Dan Wallis, in effect as of August 25, 2023, at 12 p.m., orders an immediate statewide ban on all agricultural burning, including but not limited to prescribed burning. This order shall remain in effect until rescinded.

The Office of Louisiana State Fire Marshal also issued an updated burn ban order prohibiting ALL private burning, with no limitations, pursuant to authority under R.S. 40:1602. This order is in effect as of August 25, 2023, at 12 p.m., and shall remain in effect until rescinded.

Violation of this burn ban order could result in criminal and/or civil penalties.

LDAF’s Office of Forestry is tasked with responding to wildfires at any hour, and crews are hard at work throughout the state. In the event of an emergency that requires their assistance, you can call the LDAF 24-Hour Emergency Hotline at 1-855-452-5323 or dial 911.

State of emergency

On August 14, Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency due to the multiple impacts of extreme heat affecting the state.

“This summer, the National Weather Service has issued a record number of excessive heat warnings for Louisiana,” said Gov. Edwards. “The Louisiana Department of Health reports that the state has already exceeded the average number of annual heat-related emergency room visits. Additionally, drought conditions and a significant drop in the Mississippi River’s water level have added stress on water supplies and agriculture.

This declaration will allow the state to mobilize resources and aid those most affected. Please continue to take precautions when you are outside and check on neighbors who might need assistance.”

A state of emergency is an administrative step that authorizes the use of state resources to aid in emergency response efforts. The Governor’s Office and GOHSEP will continue to update the public on heat-related threats, in addition to any other weather emergencies.

Resources

Related links

Prep for Ag Threats - Wildfires

Wildfire Evacuation Checklist

Wildfire Evacuation Checklist - Spanish

Protect People, Pets, and Property from Wildfire

Protect People, Pets, and Property from Wildfire - Spanish